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Comatose

Koprivshtitsa - the name of the next town on the itinerary. I'll buy a beer for anybody that can pronounce it correctly! The Cyrillic alphabet definitely poses a challenge, but the Western alphabet translations are actually a fairly good phonetic representation, from what I can tell so far. The combination of letters isn't quite what we are used to, and upon initial glance, pronouncing Bulgarian words appears to be a much more difficult task than it really is. Of course, this isn't to say that I'm able to pronounce anything correctly, but just well enough to be able to muddle through booking a bus and ordering food.

Having only a short time in the morning before needing to catch the bus to Koprivshtitsa, there was only an opportunity to stop by Sveta Nedelya and to take a quick stroll around Vitosha boulevard, one of the main destinations in Sofia for shopping and cafes. It's not for everybody but personally speaking, Sofia has definitely been much better than advertised - the original itinerary calls for spending one last night there, but I'll consider spending an additional night, if time permits.

One of the highlights of the Western Balkans was the friendliness of the locals, something that seems to hold true here in the Eastern Balkans. From the super-helpful lady that sold me a bus ticket, to the Koprivshtitsan lady who gave me unsolicited tips on her town, to the owner of my accommodation for the next few nights, the Hotel Panorama ... it definitely makes a traveler feel welcome and to a certain degree, at home.

I usually get the feeling that in these less-touristed countries, locals make more of an effort to ensure visitors enjoy themselves, and are extra proud of all their countries have to offer. The more touristed Western European nations don't have to work as hard, because their reputations are well-known. In a way, travelers visit those countries more for the sights - for example, one can spend an amazing week in Paris without ever having a single conversation with a local. But in places like Bulgaria, it would be strangely unfulfilling to miss out on those conversations, as many times those can be the most rewarding experiences.

Koprivshtitsa is the type of little town where your heart slows down nearly to a stop ... the pace is slow and while there really isn't much in the way of sights, the town itself is what people come to see. It's a time warp, essentially a living museum with its preserved buildings - quaint and charming, giving a glimpse of what Bulgaria once looked like. When first planning the trip, two nights were set aside for Koprivshtitsa - my first impression was that this would be WAY too long here. But after strolling around and getting a feel for the relaxed atmosphere, it seems like the ideal place to catch up on some blogs, do a bit of reading, and whiling away the hours on a terrace with a glass of wine or beer ... I can feel myself slipping into a coma ...

Koprivshtitsa's April Uprising Mausoleum ...

Koprivshtitsa's April Uprising Mausoleum ...


Sveti Nedelya, From the Outside

Sveti Nedelya, From the Outside


Sirene Bulgarian Cheese ...

Sirene Bulgarian Cheese ...


Ottoman Heritage ...

Ottoman Heritage ...


Wedding at Sveti Nedelya

Wedding at Sveti Nedelya


Banitsa, the Ultimate Backpacker Food ...

Banitsa, the Ultimate Backpacker Food ...


Famous House Museums of Koprivshtitsa ...

Famous House Museums of Koprivshtitsa ...


EXTREMELY Low Ceilings ...

EXTREMELY Low Ceilings ...


Debelyanov House ...

Debelyanov House ...


Oslekov House ...

Oslekov House ...


Hotel Panorama Balcony ...

Hotel Panorama Balcony ...


Courtyard of Restaurant Diyado Liben

Courtyard of Restaurant Diyado Liben


A Hearty Bulgarian Meal for $10 CAD ...

A Hearty Bulgarian Meal for $10 CAD ...

Posted by vagabondvoyager 17:00 Archived in Bulgaria

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